Choosing an Activity Tracker Part 2: Fitbit One

If you haven’t read Choosing an Activity Tracker Part 1: Introduction make sure you head there first. By the time I, I mean the washer, destroyed Nate’s pedometer new activity trackers were hitting the market and were “all the rave”.  I will fess up and say that I bought into the hype and purchased my first activity tracker – a Fitbit One.  I looked at the wrist trackers, the clips, all different brands, ones with and without displays, and it all came down to wanting an accurate tracker at the end of the day.  After all, I was coming from using the Omron pedometer that was Accurate with a capital A.  Fitbit is the brand known for accuracy in the activity tracker world. Thank you for noticing the accuracy of the Fitbit. We put a lot of effort into making sure the Fitbit is accurate! – Fitbit executive in a conversation with Nate From everything I read, the trackers that you clip to your waistband, bra, or pocket are more accurate than the wrist trackers so that is what I went with.  The One clips to the waistband, belt, pocket, or bra of the wearer and it has a display so I can just glance down and see my step count, floors climbed, distance, and calories without needing an app or my phone.  The One also came with a nifty wristband to wear at night for tracking sleep and for use as an alarm clock.  I used this for awhile, but realized that I didn’t care as much about sleep tracking as I did activity tracking during the day (and I lost the wristband). Now if you remember from Part 1, I could take a specific number of steps and the Omron pedometer was 100% accurate.  I did the same test with the Fitbit One and it passed with flying colors. Actual Steps Taken Omron Pedometer: Steps Recorded Fitbit One: Steps Recorded 50 50 51 100 (Trial 1) 100 99 100 (Trial 2) 100 101 These results are close enough for me and I have been happily using my Fitbit One since August 2013.  I can honestly say that I love my Fitbit One and would buy another in a heartbeat if I lost mine or broke it somehow.  If I were to hand out ratings on battery life, accuracy, ease of use, and durability this is what the...
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Choosing an Activity Tracker Part 1: Introduction

I have been posting on Facebook for weeks about wearing multiple activity trackers.  This inaugural post in the series will review one of my first “activity trackers”.  As we go through the series, I will introduce you to several common trackers on the market today and explain some of the pros and cons of each.  Obviously I don’t have an unlimited budget so I only tested a few, but this should give you an idea of the pros and cons for several popular brands and types. When I first started exercising I used a regular, inexpensive pedometer like the type you would find at Target or Walmart for $10-$20. After awhile I wanted something that would download data to my computer and Nate and I both purchased the Omron Pocket Pedometer.  The Omron pedometer is fabulous, basic, easy to use and see, and most of all – it is accurate.  I know this because the researcher in me tested the accuracy.  I walked all over counting my steps – flat surfaces, turning around, up and down stairs, walking fast, and walking slow. Check out the results below:   Number of Steps Taken: Omron Pedometer Recorded: 50 steps 50 steps 60 steps 60 steps 100 steps 100 steps As you can see, it was accurate step for step. It is a bit bulky, but it doesn’t need to be charged and takes a standard CR2032 battery that lasts for a very long time.  The pedometer comes with a belt clip, but at some point (recently) I lost the clip so I can’t show you a picture of that here.  The newer versions appear to be less bulky and are compatible with the new Omron app.       I did eventually upgrade to my current tracker, but only because Nate’s Omron pedometer went through the wash more than once and didn’t fare so well (oops). I gave him mine and began the search for a newer activity tracker. Curious what I bought? Read Choosing an Activity Tracker Part 2.   (Affiliate links used in this post)...
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